What's your benchmark?

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This post has 298 Replies | 13 Followers

Posts 453
Mike S. | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jun 3 2011 6:56 AM

NovaBench Score: 442 2011-06-03 07:51:06 -0600
Mac OS X 10.6.7                              <----------- Mac, not PC
Intel Core 2 Duo @ 3060 MHz
Graphics Card: NVIDIA GeForce 9600M GT

8192 MB System RAM (Score: 151)
- RAM Speed: 2983 MB/s

CPU Tests (Score: 240)
- Floating Point Operations/Second: 60570168
- Integer Operations/Second: 123200024
- MD5 Hashes Calculated/Second: 894073

Graphics Tests (Score: 27)
- 3D Frames Per Second: 64

Hardware Tests (Score: 24)
- Primary Partition Capacity: 465 GB
- Drive Write Speed: 42 MB/s I think the funny thing here is that your score goes UP if you have a bigger HD, if the tech stays the same, the larger the HD, the poorer the performance by definition (physics still plays a part with winchester HDs!). 

Posts 349
Frank Fenby | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jun 4 2011 8:44 AM

Here is my Lenovo W52. This does not show the result with the NIVIDA Quadro M1000 with 2 Gig of DDR3. 

 

Posts 15805
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Keep Smiling 4 Jesus :) | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jun 4 2011 10:02 AM

Frank Fenby:
Here is my Lenovo W52. This does not show the result with the NIVIDA Quadro M1000 with 2 Gig of DDR3. 

Appears desktop 1st Generation Quad Core i7 CPU bit faster than mobile 2nd Generation Quad Core i7 for Floating Point and MD5, but slower for Integer:

NovaBench Score: 1457

Mac OS X 10.6.7
Intel Core i7 @ 2930 MHz
Graphics Card: ATI Radeon HD 5750

8192 MB System RAM (Score: 163)
- RAM Speed: 5532 MB/s

CPU Tests (Score: 716)
- Floating Point Operations/Second: 287423392
- Integer Operations/Second: 582650688
- MD5 Hashes Calculated/Second: 1058452

Graphics Tests (Score: 546)
- 3D Frames Per Second: 1027

Hardware Tests (Score: 32)
- Primary Partition Capacity: 298 GB
- Drive Write Speed: 111 MB/s

 

Also notice iMac RAM Speed is slower (bit less than half as fast).

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Posts 73
John Sheeley | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jun 4 2011 7:11 PM

No idea if this is good or not...two year old Toshiba Satellite A505

Verified NovaBench Score: 355

Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium

Intel Intel Core2 Duo T6600 2.20GHz running at 2200 MHz

Mobile Intel 4 Series Express Chipset Family GPU

3964 MB System RAM (Score: 107)
- RAM Speed: 3003 MB/s

CPU Tests (Score: 210)
- Floating Point Operations/Second: 50570694
- Integer Operations/Second: 124692734
- MD5 Hashes Generated/Second: 707135

Graphics Tests (Score: 14)
- 3D Frames Per Second: 52

Hardware Tests (Score: 24)
- Primary Partition Capacity: 454 GB
- Drive Write Speed: 43 MB/s

Posts 15805
Forum MVP
Keep Smiling 4 Jesus :) | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Jun 5 2011 2:08 AM

John Sheeley:
No idea if this is good or not...two year old Toshiba Satellite A505

To compare, could like at page 5 of this thread => http://community.logos.com/forums/t/24555.aspx?PageIndex=5 that has a chart showing NovaBench score range for Logos users (noticed several with similar score).

Mike S.:
- Drive Write Speed: 42 MB/s

John Sheeley:
- Drive Write Speed: 43 MB/s

Observation about Disk Write Speed: one upgrade option is faster hard drive (7200 RPM or faster) or Solid State Disk (SSD).

Mac sales offers Do It Yourself Upgrade kits => http://eshop.macsales.com/shop/hard-drives/2.5-Notebook/SATA/DIY/ (potentially usable for Windows too)

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Posts 421
Scott S | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Oct 13 2011 9:18 PM

Keep Smiling 4 Jesus :):
Partitioned 640 GB hard drive into F: (Fast - 40 GB), C: (WIndows 7 - 208 GB), M: (Medium - 192 GB), and S: (Slow - 156 GB), then moved Windows 7 Page File to S: drive.

        &

Keep Smiling 4 Jesus :):
Plan to custom install Logos 4 on my F: drive, which should keep fastest transfer rate for Logos as other files are placed on C:, M:, or S: drives.

KS4J,

Could you please explain how partitioning a single hard drive results in fast, medium, and slow partitions?  Is partitioning a means to put performance critical  apps on the fastest part (nearest the outer edge) of the disk?

Thanks in advance . . . Scott

Posts 8601
TCBlack | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Oct 14 2011 6:31 AM

Scott S:
Could you please explain how partitioning a single hard drive results in fast, medium, and slow partitions?  Is partitioning a means to put performance critical  apps on the fastest part (nearest the outer edge) of the disk?
I'm not he... But: yes.  

Assuming concentric circle partitions the outside partition will be turning faster and have faster access speeds.  

Truth Is Still Truth Even if You Don't Believe It

Check the Wiki

Warning: Sarcasm is my love language. I may inadvertently express my love to you.

Posts 1646
SteveF | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Oct 14 2011 8:18 AM

Thomas Black:
Assuming concentric circle partitions the outside partition will be turning faster and have faster access speeds.  

If I wish to do this -- how do I know which of the (new) partitions is on the outside and is therefor the fastest?

 

Regards, SteveF

Posts 767
Alan Charles Gielczyk | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Oct 14 2011 9:40 AM

Old desktop

NovaBench Score: 631

Microsoft Windows 7 Ultimate
AMD Phenom II X4 840T @ 2900 MHz
Graphics Card: ATI Radeon HD 4600 Series

6144 MB System RAM (Score: 132)
- RAM Speed: 2712 MB/s

CPU Tests (Score: 363)
- Floating Point Operations/Second: 103338132
- Integer Operations/Second: 346710280
- MD5 Hashes Generated/Second: 644211

Graphics Tests (Score: 84)
- 3D Frames Per Second: 268

Hardware Tests (Score: 52)
- Primary Partition Capacity: 918 GB
- Drive Write Speed: 100 MB/s

 

 

 

New desktop

NovaBench Score: 884

Microsoft Windows 7 Ultimate
AMD Phenom II X6 1045T @ 2700 MHz
Graphics Card: ATI Radeon HD 5570

8192 MB System RAM (Score: 154)
- RAM Speed: 3572 MB/s

CPU Tests (Score: 511)
- Floating Point Operations/Second: 154399206
- Integer Operations/Second: 508264512
- MD5 Hashes Generated/Second: 817896

Graphics Tests (Score: 164)
- 3D Frames Per Second: 493

Hardware Tests (Score: 55)
- Primary Partition Capacity: 919 GB
- Drive Write Speed: 109 MB/s

Posts 15805
Forum MVP
Keep Smiling 4 Jesus :) | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Oct 14 2011 2:17 PM

Scott S:
Could you please explain how partitioning a single hard drive results in fast, medium, and slow partitions?  Is partitioning a means to put performance critical  apps on the fastest part (nearest the outer edge) of the disk?

Partitioning can help data transfer speeds for physical disk platters.  Whole hard spins at same rate, but surface area of a concentric circle varies with placement.  A partition by the outer edge has faster transfer speeds (since more data can be transferred before needing to move disk read/write heads).

Wikipedia article => http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hard_disk_drive#Data_transfer_rate includes: "rate depends on the track location, so it will be higher for data on the outer tracks (where there are more data sectors) and lower toward the inner tracks (where there are fewer data sectors)"

Solid State Disk (SSD) controllers should spread read and write usage evenly (partitioning should have no effect for SSD data transfer rate: no disk heads to move).

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Forum MVP
Dave Hooton | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Oct 14 2011 2:29 PM

SteveF:
If I wish to do this -- how do I know which of the (new) partitions is on the outside and is therefor the fastest?

Partitioning is from inside to outside, or left to right in most partition views. Outside is traditionally regarded as slowest even though it will have faster transfer speeds because there are more sectors on a cylinder!

Dave
===

Windows & Android

Posts 421
Scott S | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Oct 14 2011 3:22 PM

Dave Hooton:
Outside is traditionally regarded as slowest even though it will have faster transfer speeds

Dave, I understand why the outer part of the disk has a faster transfer rate, but why then is it "traditionally regarded as slowest"?

Thanks in advance . . . Scott

Posts 421
Scott S | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Oct 14 2011 3:35 PM

Keep Smiling 4 Jesus :):
Partitioning can help data transfer speeds for physical disk platters.

KS4J, Thanks for the additional information. A few further questions:

1. What partition did you put Logos on?

2. What's your ballpark estimate of the percentage improvement gained by partitioning?

3. Does a partitioning scheme like yours require a clean install?

Thanks again . . . Scott

Posts 24926
Forum MVP
Dave Hooton | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Oct 14 2011 4:57 PM

Scott S:
Dave, I understand why the outer part of the disk has a faster transfer rate, but why then is it "traditionally regarded as slowest"?

Certain products give you an estimate of the speed of partitions where they can cache data and the outer (HD) partitions were always slower. The last time I did this was 2 -3 years ago, but I've never noticed a significant difference because a lot depends on the type of data access; random being the one most typical of an average desktop computer as opposed to sequential  (reading large files). Then there is the effect of HD caching and Windows' own disk caching, especially W7.

I think it best to ignore any perception of difference based on placement of partitions on modern large capacity HD's in an OS like W7 where you have 4 GB or more of memory.

Dave
===

Windows & Android

Posts 24926
Forum MVP
Dave Hooton | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Oct 14 2011 5:04 PM

Scott S:
3. Does a partitioning scheme like yours require a clean install?

You need Partitioning software, some of which is free, because it preserves your data (moving it around as necessary). It is usually done outside of the OS by rebooting the computer and then (when finished) rebooting back to the OS.

NB. Leave the start of the OS partition where it is i.e. just make it smaller to get space for the new partition.

Dave
===

Windows & Android

Posts 3578
steve clark | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Oct 14 2011 5:15 PM

Keep in mind that if on your single Hard Drive that you have partitions which contain your OS and other programs which you may have open, that the HD head is being moved ever so frequently to the other partition(s) which contain these files. Also if you have background tasks running (e.g. antivirus scans, defragmentation) that this too will be moving the HD head to these partition(s).

So partitioning your HD to speed up Logos can really backfire on you. You would be much better off installing a 2nd HD and only putting Logos on it, that way the HD heads would be dedicated to Logos and your original HD is free to perform whatever it needs to service your OS and other programs.

QLinks, Bibl2, LLR, Macros
Dell Insp 17-5748, i5, 1.7 GHz, 8G RAM, win 8.1

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Dave Hooton | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Oct 14 2011 5:30 PM

steve clark:
So partitioning your HD to speed up Logos can really backfire on you. You would be much better off installing a 2nd HD and only putting Logos on it,

I've done that with small HD's and the difference is not noticeable (+ ensuring secondary drives do not go into idle mode). It also may not be practicable with laptop computers.

Dave
===

Windows & Android

Posts 3578
steve clark | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Oct 14 2011 5:37 PM

Dave Hooton:
It also may not be practicable with laptop computers.

True

Back in the early days of CD writers and later in the early days of DVD writers, i ran into throughput issues which slowed the writing of data to these devices. My final approach back then was to add a 2nd HD controller which connected to dedicated HDs. This proved the fastest mechanism back then. Many things came into play here: bandwidth of the controller's spicket to the HD (secondary drives on the same controller had to share BW), the speed at which the HD can move date to/from the platters, the amount of cache inside the HDs & how they were utilized with the HDs design, and how the OS's drive routines were optimized to move data.

 

QLinks, Bibl2, LLR, Macros
Dell Insp 17-5748, i5, 1.7 GHz, 8G RAM, win 8.1

Posts 24926
Forum MVP
Dave Hooton | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Oct 14 2011 6:33 PM

steve clark:
Back in the early days of CD writers and later in the early days of DVD writers, i ran into throughput issues which slowed the writing of data to these devices. My final approach back then was to add a 2nd HD controller which connected to dedicated HDs.

Parallel (PATA) drives and interfaces meant you were wise to segregate CD's/DVD's and HD's. I was amazed how many builders (and some manufacturers) put them on the same cable/controller just to save an extra piece of ribbon (or improve cooling within the case).

The small HD's I mentioned above were Serial (SATA) drives, when you had to tell Windows XP (during installation) to look at a floppy drive to get the controller software!

Dave
===

Windows & Android

Posts 15805
Forum MVP
Keep Smiling 4 Jesus :) | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Oct 14 2011 8:43 PM

Scott S:

Keep Smiling 4 Jesus :):
Partitioning can help data transfer speeds for physical disk platters.

KS4J, Thanks for the additional information. A few further questions:

1. What partition did you put Logos on?

2. What's your ballpark estimate of the percentage improvement gained by partitioning?

3. Does a partitioning scheme like yours require a clean install?

Thanks again . . . Scott

1. Custom installed Logos 4 on my F:\ (fast) partition.

2. Initially up to 7 % faster since Logos 4 was installed in fastest area of hard disk; Windows and other programs were installed in C: drive (2nd partition).  Web article shows disk zones with transfer speed changes => http://www.dewassoc.com/kbase/hard_drives/hard_disk_sector_structures.htm

Note: as Logos library grows (e.g. Perseus collections), all new Logos resources and indexes are in fastest 5 % of hard disk (avoids performance degradation since my Logos 4 is not affected by C:\ drive usage).

3. Yes, Windows deeply embeds disk partition number during installation (essentially unchangeable after installation).   Hence partitioned drive (using linux System Rescue CD), then installed Windows 7 into C:\ drive (2nd partition), followed by device driver installations and many Windows 7 updates before formatting and changing drive letters assigned to those partitions (personally like drive letter to reflect relative transfer speed: F = Fast, M = Medium, and S = Slow).

By the way, found an older Windows discussion with similar disk partition placement for gaming => http://hardforum.com/archive/index.php/t-1041663.html (partitioning starts from outer edge of disk).  Also found an informative discussion on Tom's Hardware => http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/244654-32-hard-drive-size-limitation#t1737770

Note: OCZ Technology forum has a page with many optional Windows 7 tweak ideas => http://www.ocztechnologyforum.com/forum/showthread.php?63273-*-Windows-7-Ultimate-Tweaks-amp-Utilities-*

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